World Peace Day

World Peace Day

The General Assembly, in resolution 55/282 of 7 September 2001, decided that, beginning in 2002, the International Day of peace should be observed on 21 September each year. The Assembly declared that the Day be observed as a day of global ceasefire and non- violence, an invitation to all nations and people to honour a cessation of hostilities during the day. It invited all Member States, organizations of the United Nations system, regional and non- governmental organizations and individuals to commemorate the day in an appropriate manner, including through education and public awareness, and to cooperate with the United Nations in establishing a global ceasefire. Peace is a common desire of people throughout the world.
The establishment of the United Nations in 1945, at the end of the most devastating war in human history, was an embodiment of this universal desire. Keeping peace and developing friendly relations among nations are among the main objectives of the United Nations. Peace is more than absence of war. It is about transforming our societies and uniting our global community to work together for a more peaceful, just and sustainable world for all. Though during the era of the Cold War many nations were bound to be part of bloc politics and the everlasting impact of alliances paved the way for future liaisons among nations. Superpowers try to achieve their goal through coercive use of power and we are witnessing that the United States continues to practice a policy of ‘a la carte multilateralism’, favoring only those international efforts, which correlate with its national interests. America’s belief in ‘a la carte multilateralism’ gives advantage to pick and choose its allies and mechanisms as circumstances suggest.
We have seen this policy in the case of Pakistan too, where notion of either “with us or against us” was prominent in many crucial decisions for South Asian peace and stability. In an arena of globalization, it’s really difficult for states to remain isolated and practice peace so peace within society can only be attained through good governance and rule of law and justice.
The International Day of Peace is observed every year on September 21. In today’s world, regional, sectarian and religious conflicts and divides are on the rise. The concept of global village is diminishing. The isolationists believe that they can establish peace in their countries by making their borders safe and secure. Some of the countries are planning to seal their borders by building walls in order to keep refugees from neighboring countries at bay. Such leaders must think that peace cannot be restored by the hollow covers of walls.
The ongoing conflicts in the world display a sad and miserable picture of today’s world. Innocent civilians, including women and young children, are being killed mercilessly. These unfortunate people have no access to food and shelter. Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan have been reduced to rubble with unforeseeable hope of peace in the near future. Peace promises progress whereas war results in wreckage. The need of the hour is to condemn wars at all levels. All countries must preach and promote peace keeping in mind that peace is not absence of conflict; it is the ability to handle conflict by peaceful means.